Emergency Topics in Sports Medicine

About

Course Description: An advanced course for Athletic Trainers dealing with a wide range of emergency topics in Sports Medicine.  This Emergency Topics in Sports Medicine course deals with a lot of life saving techniques used to save 

Level of Difficulty: Advanced

Presenter Bio:

Darryl Conway serves as the Senior Associate Athletic Director & Chief Health & Welfare Officer at the University of Michigan. In that role, he oversees Athletic Medicine, Performance Science, Performance Nutrition, Olympic Strength and Conditioning, Performance Science, and Equipment Operations personnel, as well as serving as the liaison to the Athletic Counseling Team & Team Physicians from Michigan Medicine and the University of Michigan University Health Services. Darryl came to the University of Michigan in 2013 from the University of Maryland, where he served as the Assistant Athletic Director- Sports Medicine. Darryl has also worked fulltime as an athletic trainer at the University of Central Florida, the University of Northern Iowa, Morgan State University, the University of Delaware, and the New York Jets Football Club. Darryl holds a Masters’ Degree from Adelphi University (’95) in Sports Medicine and Sports Management and a Bachelors’ Degree from the University of Delaware (’93) in Physical Education Studies and Athletic Training. In addition to being a certified member of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), Darryl has worked with various SWAT Teams as their Tactical Medic and Athletic Trainer, and as a volunteer EMT, and has been an American Red Cross first aid, CPR, and AED instructor for 30 years.

Course Objectives:

1. Explain how a pre-hospital inter-professional healthcare team works collaboratively to improve patient outcomes.

2. Identify the current NATA and EMS recommendations regarding the pre-hospital management of the opioid overdose patient.

3. Define, discuss, and differentiate the indications, contraindications, and mechanism of action of naloxone.

4. Describe and demonstrate skills needed for:  (1) effective management of airway, breathing, and circulation in the opioid overdose patient;  and (2) the administration of naloxone.

5. Demonstrate the proper sequence and implementation of critical decision-making skills and the current evidence.

6. Understand the need for the rapid identification and management of gross bleeding in the trauma patient.

7. Identify the phases of hemorrhagic shock and the physiological changes.

8. Examine and discuss the current scientific evidence to determine the effectiveness and efficacy for the use of various advanced wound care interventions.

9. Compare and contrast the roles, characteristics, indications, contraindications, precautions, and advantages / disadvantages for using tourniquets, pressure dressings, wound packing, and simple chest seals as critical interventions identified in the primary trauma assessment.


Additional Information

​Course Objectives:

1. Explain how a pre-hospital inter-professional healthcare team works collaboratively to improve patient outcomes.

2. Identify the current NATA and EMS recommendations regarding the pre-hospital management of the opioid overdose patient.

3. Define, discuss, and differentiate the indications, contraindications, and mechanism of action of naloxone.

4. Describe and demonstrate skills needed for:  (1) effective management of airway, breathing, and circulation in the opioid overdose patient;  and (2) the administration of naloxone.

5. Demonstrate the proper sequence and implementation of critical decision-making skills and the current evidence.

6. Understand the need for the rapid identification and management of gross bleeding in the trauma patient.

7. Identify the phases of hemorrhagic shock and the physiological changes.

8. Examine and discuss the current scientific evidence to determine the effectiveness and efficacy for the use of various advanced wound care interventions.

9. Compare and contrast the roles, characteristics, indications, contraindications, precautions, and advantages / disadvantages for using tourniquets, pressure dressings, wound packing, and simple chest seals as critical interventions identified in the primary trauma assessment.